7/22/2008

[转载]路透:奥运场馆准备就绪 建筑工人卷铺盖回家(视频)




Video:Workers leave Beijing pre-Games

Jul 17(Reuters)- The men and women who built the foundations of the Olympic dream are leaving Beijing.

With the construction of the Olympic venues entering its final phase, the millions of migrant workers who built Beijing's new icons are packing their bags and going home.

Tyra Dempster reports.

http://www.reuters.com/news/video?videoId=87285

福禄祯祥按:路透中文网提供的译文不完整,没有英文报道的末尾四段。

奥运场馆准备就绪 建筑工人卷铺盖回家

2008年 7月 21日 星期一 17:01 BJT

路透北京7月21日电(记者Kitty Bu)---国家体育场“鸟巢”被奉为北京的骄傲之作,是2008年奥运会的标志性建筑之一。但是为这一建筑抛洒汗水的农民工们可能无法亲眼看到它承办奥运赛事、展现勃勃生机了。

随着奥运会开幕日期的临近,本周北京市开始了大规模的城市清理工作,为奥运会31个场馆建设做出贡献的许多外来务工人员就在被清理之列。他们已经开始收拾行囊,准备回到自己农村的家中。

“我要先在这里种上花草,然後去天安门种,种花的工作完成了我就会离开,我就回家。”来自河南的农民工何静玲(音)说。她的工作就是种花,美化北京市,这座在奥运会期间将吸引无数游客和运动员的城市。

北京奥运会前的清理工作还包括停止一些工地施工,关闭部分工厂,限制私家车出行等,这些措施都是为了打赢对付长期污染的硬仗,改善环境。污染问题是北京奥运会组织者面临的最棘手问题之一。

随之而来的还有安保大清查。

很多农民工来到北京,长时间的辛勤劳作就是为了赚取那份比在家里工作稍稍丰厚的薪水。但是各项工程停工以後,大约会有400万人离开北京。

现在,已经有大批的工人排队守候在汽车站和火车站,他们有的要回家,有的则准备前往另一个繁华的都市寻求新的工作。

没有任何成文的法律规定外来务工人员在完成自己的工作後必须离开,但是许多农民工缺少那些可以让他们留下来的必要证件。

北京现在已经加强了身份证检查,同时有10万警力在京城内外投入了安全检查工作。这些措施都让外来务工人员忐忑不安。

王星跃是(音)外来工中的幸运儿,因为他的奥运相关建筑行业工作合同直到奥运会结束後才到期,所以他就有机会见证这场体育盛事了。

“我的工作完成了我才会离开,所以奥运会结束了我才会走。”王星跃说。

来自山东的秦伟章(音)夫妇由于建筑工作合同已经到期,即将离开北京前往内蒙古,因为听说那里有工作机会。

秦伟章说,很遗憾要错过在自己国家观看奥运的机会,但工作是第一位的。

“我们没有时间。我想看奥运,但必须挣钱呀,”他说。(完)

翻译:彭雅然 发稿:段晓冬

© 路透 2008 版权所有

http://cn.reuters.com/article/wtNews/idCNChina-1749420080721?sp=true

英文报道原文:

Beijing Olympic clean up sweeps out migrant workers

Mon Jul 21, 2008 3:06am EDT

By Kitty Bu

BEIJING (Reuters Life!) - The "Bird's Nest" national stadium is the pride of Beijing and one of the iconic structures of China's 2008 Olympic Games, but the men and women who built it may never see it coming to life.

As the opening ceremony of the Games approaches, the army of migrant workers who worked on the city's 31 Olympic projects are packing their bags and heading back to their rural homes as part of a city clean-up campaign that starts in earnest this week.

"Once the work is finished I will leave, I will plant the beds here, then in Tiananmen and then I will go home," said He Jingling, a worker from Henan province who came to Beijing to plant flowers in areas of Beijing that are expected to be filled with tourists and world athletes during the Olympics.

Beijing's pre-Olympic clean-up involves halting construction in the city, shutting factories and limiting the number of cars on the road to help combat chronic pollution, which is one of the biggest headaches for the Games' organizers.

It is also accompanied by a security crackdown.

As the work stops, many of the estimated four million people, who descended on Beijing to toil long hours for a wage slightly better than what they would make at home, are leaving.

Already, migrant workers are queuing at bus and railway stations to go home or to other prosperous cities in the hope of finding work.

There is no official law stating migrants have to leave once the job is complete, but many lack the proper paperwork to stay.

Identity card checks have already been stepped up and a 100,000 strong police force has set up security checks both inside and outside the city, leaving unregistered migrants fearful of the authorities.

Wang Xingyue is one of the luckier ones -- his Olympic construction contract runs out after the Games end, giving him a chance to witness the event.

"I will stay until our work is finished, when the Olympics end I will go," he said.

Qin Weizhang and his wife, from Shandong, were leaving Beijing for Inner Mongolia, where they heard of work opportunities after their Olympic construction contract ended.

He said he would miss the opportunity to see the Olympics in his own country, but work came first.

"We do not have the time. I want to see the Olympics but I have to earn money," he added.

Zhang Zhanxin, an associate professor at China's main government think-tank the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said migrant workers are often discriminated against by city-dwellers who look down on them and make them feel unwelcome.

Human rights groups also say migrant workers are vulnerable to exploitation in the workplace and often lack basic health care and protection.

"People in the countryside are relatively poor and so their children only finish primary or middle school. So basically, people from rural areas are less educated and city-dwellers call them uncultured," Zhang said.

"People from the countryside also rarely come to the big cities and because they are unaccustomed to city rules and habits they are looked down on."

(Writing by Miral Fahmy, editing by Ben Blanchard)

© Thomson Reuters 2008 All rights reserved

http://www.reuters.com/article/GCA-Olympics/idUSSP26521520080721?sp=true

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